Cheesy Potato Crusted Fish Strips with Rémoulade


Chef’s Notes: This is a “little bit gourmet” version of frozen minced fish sticks and tartar sauce. Fish fillets are cut into strips, coated with cheese-flavored instant potatoes and lemon basil, then fried. Rémoulade is French tartar sauce that includes capers and whole grain mustard.

Cheesy Potato Crusted Fish Strips

Cheesy Potato Crusted Fish Strips

Cheesy Potato Crusted Fish Strips
Serves 4

3 or 4 orange roughy fish fillets
Fresh ground pepper
1/2 C. flour
2 egg whites
3/4 C. Betty Crocker Four Cheese Instant Potatoes
1 tsp. lemon basil

(Don’t have lemon basil? Use lemon pepper seasoning on the fish, and mix basil with the potato flakes.)

Sprinkle fish with pepper. Cut each fillet into 4 or 5 strips. Put the flour, egg, and potato in 3 separate shallow dishes. Dredge the fish strips in flour. Then dip into the egg white. Then coat with potato flakes mixed with lemon basil.

Watch this video if you’re not familiar with the three-step breading procedure:
Three-Step Breading Procedure

In large skillet, heat enough canola oil so that it will cover the fish about half way. When the oil is hot and bubbly, add fish strips and cook until browned. Turn and cook on other side until browned, about 3-4 minutes per side. (Only turn the fish once; turning it frequently will cause the breading to fall off.)

Rémoulade
3/4 C. mayonnaise
1 T. dill pickle relish
1 tsp. finely chopped capers (or green olives)
1 T. lemon juice
1 T.whole grain mustard
2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley
Dash hot sauce, or to taste

Combine all ingredients in small bowl and mix thoroughly. Makes about one cup.

You can also buy rémoulade online.

A note about capers. This is one of those foods that I definitely recommend buying in the highest quality you can find and afford. Cheap capers are usually big, taste like fishy vinegar and are quite appalling. Higher end capers (especially nonpareils capers) are smaller, more delicate and taste a bit like lemony olives. For years, I thought I hated capers, until I learned the difference.

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